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Nomination of Honours & Awards
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NOMINATION FOR AN HONOUR
SARK, BAILIWICK OF GUERNSEY
GUIDANCE NOTES

 

 

WHO MAY MAKE A NOMINATION

Anyone may make a nomination by completing a nomination form and sending it to The Speaker of Sark Chief Pleas.

COMPLETING THE NOMINATION FORM

Please complete the nomination form in full and accurately, following the instructions in each section closely. It is important that you provide as much information as possible about your nominee, and try to explain what their actual contribution in an area has been, as opposed to just listing jobs or posts held. You may use additional sheets of paper, but please ensure that you state to which section the additional information you are providing relates.

NUMBER AND TYPE OF HONOURS

Honours are given to people from all walks of life and all sections of society who have made a difference to their community. The number of honours available is strictly limited and therefore, however valuable their service, not everyone can receive recognition. It is important to realise that an honour will not automatically follow a submission. The type and level of award need not be stated.

TIMING OF NOMINATIONS

There are no deadlines for the receipt of nomination forms, but their consideration is likely to take at least 12 to 18 months. Therefore, you should not nominate a person for a specific Honours List. Nominations should be made while the nominee is still active and, if possible, at least 12 months before he/she is expected to retire or stand down. Honours Lists are published at New Year and on the occasion of The Sovereign's Official Birthday.

UNSUCCESSFUL NOMINATIONS AND RE-NOMINATIONS

If, after three years, your nominee has not been successful you may assume the nomination has lapsed. You may re-nominate but a different outcome is unlikely unless your nominee has had additional achievements.
CONFIDENTIALITY
All nominations for honours are treated in the strictest confidence. The nominee must not be informed that they have been nominated, as it is not fair to raise expectations in case they are not met.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND PROGRESS OF NOMINATIONS

Upon receipt of your nomination, The Speaker of Sark Chief Pleas will send an acknowledgement. Please note that it is not possible to enter into correspondence on the merits of a particular nomination whilst it is under consideration.

CHANGES TO INFORMATION SUBMITTED

You may send additional information to support the nomination at any time, and we will ensure that this is considered with the existing papers. The Speaker of Sark Chief Pleas should also be advised if there has been any important change to the information supplied on the nomination form, such as the home address of the nominee.

NON - BRITISH CITIZENS

People who are not British citizens or citizens of Commonwealth countries of which The Queen is Head of State, are eligible to be considered for awards but the award may be an honorary one.

THE QUEEN’S AWARD FOR VOLUNTARY SERVICE

This annual award recognises and rewards outstanding achievement by groups in the community. Further information can be obtained at www.qavs.direct.gov.uk or by calling 0207 271 6206.

 

 

TOP TIPS FOR WRITING CITATIONS

 
 

The citation is the key part of the nomination form. The more convincing it is the better the chance of success. It needs to cover a number of areas and it will be assessed on the robustness of the evidence provided. If the nomination is subsequently recommended it will be read by people who will have no personal knowledge of your candidate and/or his or her achievements.

What to say when making your candidate's case for an honour

Each committee will look to the nomination to provide evidence of:

  • Merit and excellence

    • How and why the candidate's service or contribution is exceptional
    • What specifically they have done and how it marks them out from others
    • How and in what ways they have gone the extra mile, above and beyond that reasonably expected or paid for
  • Any special achievements

  • How and in what ways has the candidate made a real difference

    • The impact of their activities
    • The importance of their work to the community at large
    • The added value they have brought to the world in which they work
    • How and why they stand out as head and shoulders above their colleagues or as the best in their field
    • Whether they are role models, highly respected or exemplars of best practice in their field
    • Whether colleagues or the public will see an honour as truly deserved
  • A sustained contribution, unless nominated for a specific or set of outstanding achievements over a shorter period

HOW TO WRITE UP YOUR CANDIDATE'S CASE FOR AN HONOUR DOS AND DON'TS

DO

  • Remember that the long citation is the case for an honour and should give a full and rounded but accurate and honest picture of why the candidate deserves an honour.
  • Aim for an opening sentence that summarises the person's achievements or contribution in a way likely to capture the interest of the reader.
  • Concentrate on the key reasons why you think your candidate deserves an honour.
  • Highlight your candidate's personal contribution referring to substantial examples of his or her achievements or service and the impact of their activities (not just dates and roles within committees).
  • Mention if officials in other organisations/agencies would support the nomination and include details of any work the candidate does for voluntary bodies.
  • Follow the candidate's contribution as chronologically as possible and include dates where known.
  • Use plain English and short unambiguous sentences.
  • Spell out the names of an organisation when first used, then use the abbreviation.
  • Present numbers one to nine in words. 10 and above in numbers.
  • Round monetary sums e.g. 4m not 4 million.

DO NOT

  • Waste space by using paragraphs or repeating your candidate's name, he or she is fine.
  • Include information about their education and early career unless relevant to the case.
  • List the posts held by your candidate without an indication of their special contribution to them
  • Overuse superlatives. If using exceptional or outstanding - justify it.
  • Include unsubstantiated or doubtful information.
  • Mention disabilities or difficult home circumstances unless it has a direct bearing on the case.
  • Include text that fails to add anything new to what you have already said.
  • Use abbreviations unless universally known e.g. BBC.
  • Use capital letters unless warranted.
  • Include quotation marks, acronyms, italics, underlined or bold text.

FINALLY

Once you have written your candidate's case, re-read it and ask the following questions:

  • Why am I really nominating this person?
  • What have they done to deserve an honour?
  • Why now?

If the case does not answer your questions clearly and persuasively and provide the necessary evidence, then it is not strong enough. Think about how you can improve it and how you can get any missing information. The Chief of Staff at Government House can advise you about this.